So, you have the interest of your pupils to learn and play cricket.

But how can your harness that interest further?

Here are a number of ideas and suggestions that have worked:

Increase volume of lessons

How many lessons of cricket do your pupils get to enjoy at the moment?

With demand and curriculum requirement for other sports, it could be that you and your fellow teaching colleagues are limited to the number of cricket-specific lessons you are able to deliver.

If not, try to work in another couple of lessons; but remember to vary the content of their delivery to maintain the interest.

Extra-curricular sessions

If additional lessons are not feasible, look at setting up extra-curricular cricket sessions with a lunchtime club or an after-school club.

If teaching staff resource is not feasible, perhaps look at bringing in external support with a specialist cricket coaching company.

Taster sessions and one-off sessions

Create a series of new taster sessions or one-off sessions specifically for those pupils who have not played before or who have only played a little.

There may be pupils who did not feel comfortable in wanting to try cricket, so by creating a one-off or series of tasters for newbies, they may feel more inclined to participate and not feel so overawed in front of more confident and experienced pupils.

Boys and girls-only sessions

In the same vein as taster sessions, why not establish boys or girls only sessions.

Participation by girls in sport is on the up and in cricket in particular.

Look to then take advantage of that trend and you see yourself with your own girls’ team or teams.

County Cricket Boards and local clubs

Seek the support of your local cricket board or local cricket club to see if they will deliver some sessions for you.

New faces from the outside with different ideas always energise sessions, and the knowledge that your local cricket board or club is coming in specifically to deliver some lessons, sessions or coaching will more often than not see an increase in interest and participation.

School matches

Does your school have inter-school cricket matches with other schools?

If not, look to arrange fixtures with other schools in the area.

If you have inter-school matches already in place, is there provision to increase the number of matches?

If there is interest to do so, perhaps look to field a second or third team, or that girls-only team (if one does not exist).

Children love nothing more than competitive sport, and especially when it is against other schools.

Satellite club

Look to set up a satellite cricket club with your local cricket club at school.

Pupils can be at the heart of decision making and shape how the school club is run. Activity at the club may range from extra-curricular coaching and forums to discuss club activity, to organising social events and ambassador visits.

As well as helping more young players move into their local cricket club, the satellite clubs will give young people a sense of ownership and will help them develop important life skills such as leadership, teamwork and cooperation.

These skills will help them become role models in their local community to inspire younger children to take up the game.