Technology has developed over the years, with video cameras being more advanced, iPads being used to analyse sport and even phones now being used to analyse performance.

Video analysis was once used for biomechanical and sports science reasons only, however coaches of all sports are now using video analysis to improve the performance of their players. This can happen in many formats as the technology involved has grown in quality, along with an increase in the number of devices available for video analysis to take place.

One benefit of using video analysis is injury prevention and injury management.  Initially, it may not be apparent to the coaches that there is an injury present; on a slow motion video, it may become much clearer. Sport at the highest level has so much pressure involved and being able to spot a minor injury and apply the correct prevention and management methods could mean the difference between winning trophies and league titles and not.

Another advantage is that video analysis can allow comparisons to be made between a video of before an injury management or even training and afterwards. This can be shown to the players or to other coaches as evidence to back up the claims made by the individual.

Video analysis can involve slow motion cameras and apps to slow the speed of the match down; however, it can be used for another purpose. It is used for scouting purposes as it allows the coaches and scouts to watch games back and not have to make split second decisions on a player or individual. With sports such as football, rugby or netball, being able to scout a player can be down to an individual’s interpretation. In contrast, athletics is defined by numbers and achieving the best time or distance.

 Another popular use of video analysis is the opportunity it gives to examine the opposition: in team sports, the manager may choose to show their team a video of their next opposition, highlighting their tactics, player traits and possible weaknesses of the team.

With the development of sports science and video quality and software continuing to develop all the time, the future for video analysis in sport will only develop further and become an even bigger part of the day-to-day structure of many sports. Although video analysis was once only for professional sports teams, it can now be very useful for development when used in amateur and junior sport.